Category Archives: Studio

Hill House Radio

Many of you may already be aware of our latest self-produced endeavor, Hill House Radio, but for those of you who haven’t, or aren’t quite sure what it is, we’d like to formally introduce you all.

Hill House Radio (HHR) is a bi-weekly (once every 2 weeks) music podcast that the Humble Giants team has been working on, and releasing, since the beginning of 2012 (first episodes released on 1/2/2012 to be exact!). HHR is our attempt to engage with culture and be a content provider. The podcast doesn’t look to revolutionize music or how you listen to music – rather, our goal is to provide a solid 1-hr long playlist to our friends, partners and fans. These are tunes that we, at Humble Giants, listen to, work to and play to – and we thought sharing these would be a great way to give you all a glimpse into our aural world.

We also happen to think these playlists represent some of the best that the music world has to offer, and has offered. HHR isn’t just about current/trending music, it’s about GOOD music. So whether that means a brand new tune from Tanlines (like in the just released, episode #17), a massive classic (like Nightshift from Commodores, episode #16) or a brilliant new remix of a beloved tune (like the Hannes Fischer remix of 93′ Til Infinity, episode #10), we craft every episode with a mind towards flow, not popularity.

As we say on the HHR website:

“Our musical guide is the tap in our foot — blind to borders and eras. So sit back, subscribe and enjoy some great tunes with us. Whether you’re at work, at the gym, mixing a cocktail or just professionally chilling, HHR will have something for you. And if you’re a music buff, a n00b or still listening to Toni Braxton, HHR will probably have something for you too.”

Hill House Radio Website
Link to Subscribe (via iTunes) to HHR

Lightweight Stacey

There are many, MANY, Content Management System (or CMS) websites/applications out there. From the ubiquitous WordPress, to the artsy Cargo Collective, to the user-friendly Cushy CMS and the business-geared Shopify. All of these services provide something that, just a few years ago, was out of reach for most people: easy website building.

As the blog model became a bigger and bigger influence over our daily lives & national culture (remember Livejournal?), “normal” people started picking up the publication mantle and began creating their own “blogs”. For years, most people put a distinction between a blog and a website – although in all technical senses the two are identical. But as our media culture became saturated with blogger celebs like Perez Hilton, we stopped seeing the difference and early adopters began modding their blogs to the hills and back. Eventually WordPress opened up their template system, allowed for multiple page themes, and ka-boom—here we are.

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James Victore

Pretty aggressive, but also really insightful. James Victore cuts through the bullshit and talks about the design business in a real way. It’s rare to see, but beautiful when done well. Bravo.

via Monsieur Bandit

Making Britain Modern

Making Britain Modern
July 20th – October 30th 2011
Design Museum London

Kenneth Grange is Britain’s leading product designer, his prolific career spans over 50 years and he is responsible for designing some of the most iconic and familiar products and appliances that shape our daily lives. Kodak cameras, the silhouette for the Intercity 125 train, Kenwood food mixers, Parker pens, and the re-design of the London black cab are just some of his well-known designs.

In 1972 Grange, together with Alan Fletcher, Theo Crosby, Colin Forbes and Mervyn Kurlansky established Pentagram, a world renowned multi-disciplinary design consultancy. More recently, in the 1990s, Grange has produced distinctive designs that have become part of our landscape, from the Adshel bus shelter in 1993 to the Rural Post box for Royal Mail in 1998.

Wish I was in London for such a promising show. Grange’s work spans so many industries and mediums, and his unique visions have always been an inspiration. I mean, he invented the look of Kodak cameras. That’s not huge, that’s MONSTROUS.

via Swiss Legacy