Category Archives: Product Design

Nike FlyKnit

It’s unsurprising to hear that Nike has put out a new shoe, or some fancy new material for shoe making. But whats even more exciting than that is when Nike takes that next big step and straight up changes the Paradigm of how we, as a culture, think about shoes, and moreover, fitness apparel.

I’ve previously read that internally, Nike has a challenge to switch Paradigms like this every 10 years. You saw it with their Nike+ technology, and the integration of iPods directly into their product lines. They’ve done this time and time again, sometimes with amazingly powerful results, and sometimes to little fanfare and a sullen disappearance.

But this time, Nike has outdone itself – which is no small feat in and of itself.
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Wibit Water Sports

Just stumbled on these really awesome products by Wibit Sports. Their awesomely inflatable play courses look like they’d be tons of fun for children, teens and adults alike. Their slogan “How Much Fun Can You Handle?” seems pretty appropriate. I don’t know that I could handle as much fun as the people in these photos are having.

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James Victore

Pretty aggressive, but also really insightful. James Victore cuts through the bullshit and talks about the design business in a real way. It’s rare to see, but beautiful when done well. Bravo.

via Monsieur Bandit

Making Britain Modern

Making Britain Modern
July 20th – October 30th 2011
Design Museum London

Kenneth Grange is Britain’s leading product designer, his prolific career spans over 50 years and he is responsible for designing some of the most iconic and familiar products and appliances that shape our daily lives. Kodak cameras, the silhouette for the Intercity 125 train, Kenwood food mixers, Parker pens, and the re-design of the London black cab are just some of his well-known designs.

In 1972 Grange, together with Alan Fletcher, Theo Crosby, Colin Forbes and Mervyn Kurlansky established Pentagram, a world renowned multi-disciplinary design consultancy. More recently, in the 1990s, Grange has produced distinctive designs that have become part of our landscape, from the Adshel bus shelter in 1993 to the Rural Post box for Royal Mail in 1998.

Wish I was in London for such a promising show. Grange’s work spans so many industries and mediums, and his unique visions have always been an inspiration. I mean, he invented the look of Kodak cameras. That’s not huge, that’s MONSTROUS.

via Swiss Legacy